Key Components Of A Post-Divorce Estate Plan

What are the potential problems? Although a divorce generally erases the rights of an ex-spouse under a will, property going to minors will be held in a conservatorship until the age of majority in the state where you reside—usually, age 18. And, if your ex-spouse is the conservator, he or she may have more control over your assets than you would have liked. A court will supervise the conservator, but that person still has considerable discretion over what happens to property.

Other problems may arise if a child doesn't have the financial knowledge and expertise to manage assets after reaching the age of majority. A good chunk of your accumulated wealth could be squandered through spending sprees or bad investments.

But you don't have to stand pat and just let things play out. You can update your estate plan by creating or modifying one or more trusts. You also might eliminate or revise other trusts that had your ex-spouse playing a pivotal role. If the trust allows it, you might simply replace your former spouse with another person.

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This article was written by a professional financial journalist for Advisor Products and is not intended as legal or investment advice.

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